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How to Attract Wildlife to Your Backyard

You can observe your region's wildlife from the comfort of your backyard patio. Simply provide a lush, fertile environment with the animals' needs and before long, groups of animals will come to clean themselves, eat and congregate in your backyard. Read the tips listed below and learn about how to attract wildlife to your backyard.

  • Food Where you live and what type of wildlife you hope to attract will greatly affect what type of food you put out for animals. Two general types of food that you can plant or lay out are berries and nuts. A wide variety of birds and animals will flock to your backyard to eat from your shrubs or feeders. Planting a wide array of shrubs and trees -- from cherries and currants to cranberries and olives -- will ensure that you attract all types of animals throughout the year [source: NPWRC].
  • Water Water is necessary if you want to attract a wide range of animals to your backyard. No matter how edible your vegetation may be, the animals may not come if there's no water. Birdbaths are an excellent way to attract different species of birds, frogs and other amphibians. Dripping hoses or shallow dishes of water will invite reptiles, butterflies and other small animals. To attract larger animals, set an in-ground pool on your property under a shaded area surrounded by vegetation and rocks. It's important to ensure that your water source is consistently filled with water to attract the animals and provide them with a place for drinking and bathing [source: Hutchins].
  • Coverage An excellent method to draw wildlife to your backyard is to provide them with shelter from their predators and refuge from bad weather. Planting a wide range of trees and bushes will further entice animals into visiting your home. Ensure that there is an assortment of trees at various heights to attract a variety of birds and small animals. As well, dead trees are a preferred nesting site for many animals, including owls and woodpeckers [source: Hutchins]. //]]]]> ]]>