Interactive Database of NYC Dog Names Provides Endless Distraction


New Yorkers love their dogs, and the internet loves a searchable data visualization. We're all in luck. Andy Katz/Pacific Press/LightRocket/Getty Images
New Yorkers love their dogs, and the internet loves a searchable data visualization. We're all in luck. Andy Katz/Pacific Press/LightRocket/Getty Images

It's easy to fall in love with a new furry friend, but a new name? Not so much. If you're having trouble settling on the perfect name for your dog and are looking for inspiration, take a gander at New York City's dog name database.

The annually updated database features an interactive map and a search bar that will allow you to fritter away hours of time — whether you're searching for the perfect pet moniker, or are simply curious about the creativity of NYC's pet parents.

Certain dog names are popular in some New York neighborhoods, while almost non-existent in others.
Certain dog names are popular in some New York neighborhoods, while almost non-existent in others.
Kian Hong Ng/EyeEm/Getty Images

The list is produced by NYC's Department of Health & Mental Hygiene, and the data comes from city dog registrations. Legally required, but frequently shirked, NYC dog registration is something the department hopes to spur with this database. The interactive online map is also a fantastic way to settle the classic Nintendo versus Sega debate, as you can discover how many people named their dog Mario (16) versus Sonic (11).

The top takers in the city? Standards like Bella (1,358), Max (1,268), Charlie (868) and Coco (652).

However, in 2016, an interesting foodie trend emerged. New Yorkers chose to name an increasing number of dogs after fruits, vegetables, spices and herbs. Visit an NYC dog park and you're likely to run into Ginger (348), Pepper (270), Olive (174) or Cinnamon (75). And if you really want to stir up a pet frenzy, call out a few other animal names New Yorkers settled on for their canines, such as Bear (308), Tiger (104), Moose (75) or Panda (63).

The database even has a map of unique dog names broken up by neighborhood. In the Lower East Side, for instance, the most popular canine moniker is Bebe, while on the Upper East Side, Nellie takes the top spot. And according to the database, there are even three proud pooches named Beyoncé.