©2006 Publications International, Ltd. Method 1, Step 2

Restraining an injured cat is a great technique to learn to help your pet receive the proper cat care. How you approach the cat will depend on whether the cat is cooperative or uncooperative. This is important because a cat has five weapons: the mouth and four claws. Cats don't react in their usual manner when they're injured because of the stresses involved. The following methods should minimize your chances of being scratched or bitten by the frightened cat you are trying to help.

Restraining a Cooperative Cat

You should try Method 1 or Method 2 when you have someone else with you to help your injured cat. Place the cat in your arms or lap or on a table or other raised surface using either of the following two methods.

Method 1

Step 1: Position yourself so the cat's head is to your left.

Step 2: Reach with your right hand over the cat's body and under its chest so the chest is resting in your palm.

Step 3: Lift the cat firmly toward you so that its body is secured between your forearm and your body.

Step 4: Grasp the top of the front legs with the fingers of your right hand, which is still supporting the chest.

Step 5: Using the other hand, prevent the head from moving by grasping under the throat. Scratching the ears with this hand from under the throat is often very comforting.

Step 6: Treatment can then be administered by your assistant while the cat is in your arms.

Method 2

Step 1: Grasp the loose skin on the back of the neck just below the ears. Lift the cat; most cats will become very submissive when this method is used.

©2006 Publications International, Ltd. Method 2, Steps 1 and 2

Step 2: Grasp the hind legs with your other hand to prevent scratching.

Step 3: Still holding the cat, place it on a table, injured side up.

Step 4: Pull forward on the skin of the neck and pull backward on the hind legs as if gently but firmly stretching the cat.

Step 5: Have your assistant administer first aid.

If You are Alone

If you are alone to restrain the injured cat, use extreme caution along with the following tips.

Step 1: Grasp the loose skin on the back of the neck just below the ears.

Step 2: Lift the cat, and place it on its chest on a table or other raised surface.

Step 3: If the cat will not stay, place it in a large, open box.

Step 4: Administer first aid to the injured cat.

Restraining an Uncooperative Cat

Even if a cat is normally docile, you should be prepared for him or her to give you some trouble. Below are some techniques to help you remain in control of the situation.

If You Have an Assistant

Method 1

You should try this method when you have someone else with you to help your uncooperative injured cat.

Step 1: Drop a blanket or towel over the cat.

Step 2: Scoop up the cat so the towel or blanket encompasses the entire cat, including all four paws.

©2006 Publications International, Ltd. Method 1, Step 3. In this case, the cat has a head injury.

Step 3: Expose only the injured area, keeping the rest of the cat covered.

Step 4: Have your assistant administer first aid. If the cat is still very aggressive, transport untreated, still covered in the blanket or towel, to the veterinarian.

If You are Alone

Method 2

You should try this method when you have no one else to help you with your uncooperative injured cat.

Step 1: Drop a blanket or towel over the cat.

Step 2: Scoop up the cat so the towel or blanket encompasses the entire cat, including all four paws.

Step 3: Tie the ends of the towel or blanket together with a cord to form a bag, or place the cat in a closed box.

Step 4: Do not attempt to treat the cat's injury. Transport the cat to the veterinarian.

©Publications International, Ltd.