Pets

Pets make wonderful companions. Learn how to take care of pets, read about common pet behavior issues and injuries and pick up general pet care tips.

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If you've owned cats for a while, you may think you know exactly where they like to be touched. But a study found that cat lovers are the folks most likely to pet felines in places they dislike.

By Dave Roos

A first-of-its-kind study out of Japan set to find out, and the results were surprising to everybody.

By Laurie L. Dove

Brushing your dog's teeth might be a bit unpleasant for both of you, but it will keep your furry friend healthier longer.

By Jesslyn Shields

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It's after midnight. Do you know where your cat is?

By Kristen Hall-Geisler

Ugliness, like beauty, may be in the eye of the beholder. A 17-year-old dog with tumors and a sweet disposition won the annual contest.

By Patty Rasmussen

The energetic and friendly Swedish Vallhund was originally bred more than 1,000 years ago and was saved from extinction in 1942.

By Laurie L. Dove

Dogs lick humans for all types of reasons. But do they really lick us to tell us they love us?

By Sharise Cunningham

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When that sandpaper tongue gets going on your face, does it mean your cat loves you, or simply likes the way you taste?

By Jesslyn Shields

If you want to prevent a "whoopsie" litter of puppies but you're not quite ready to spay or neuter your dog, try a dog chastity belt. A no, we're not kidding.

By Allison Troutner

Buckle up Fido! That's right. Your furry friend should be wearing a seat belt in the car. Not just for their safety, but for yours, too.

By Allison Troutner

Wolves do it. So is howling just an inherited trait dogs have kept through the eons, or is there more to why our furry friends still vocalize in this manner?

By Stephanie Parker

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Although a bit shy, lionhead rabbits do make great pets. After all, who wouldn't want a cuddly little lion hopping around the house?

By Laurie L. Dove

Tigers love to swim in the wild. So why do most housecats act like coming in contact with water will use up a several of their nine lives?

By Kristen Hall-Geisler

Dog owners know: Their four-legged friends are stuck to them like Velcro. But why? Are they afraid of being left behind, or is it something else?

By John Donovan

Not much could be better than coming back in your next life as a house cat (OK, maybe a dog, but we won't go there). But if you had the chance, you'd better think hard about where you'd live first.

By Kristen Hall-Geisler

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Cats howl for a lot of reasons: They want you to buy them things; they want more food (better food). But as they age, they howl a lot more. Are they trying to tell us something else?

By Kristen Hall-Geisler

Some love to do it; others find it gross. But is there a health reason not to kiss your furry friends?

By Alia Hoyt

Dogs and fireworks just don't mix. And in the United States, the Fourth of July is a dog's worst nightmare.

By Christine Calder

A new era of pet foods created in the lab, sustainably and with reduced environmental impact, is coming. But will pets — and their humans — like it?

By John Donovan

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The Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show has been around longer than basketball. Heck even light bulbs. For the first time, it won't have any human spectators and it will be held outside.

By John Donovan

A study using citizen science tries to help explain why cats love sitting in boxes — even ones that aren't there. What did they find out?

By Kristen Hall-Geisler

A dog that won't come when it's called and growls at children might be smarter than a sweeter pooch, as long as it's trained by a stranger.

By Jesslyn Shields

With a very friendly personality, the Egyptian Mau can be trained to do almost anything a dog can do, from walking on a leash to fetching a ball.

By Patty Rasmussen

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The most obvious feature of Manx cats is their lack of a tail, but there is a lot more to them than that, including the fact that they have dog-like personalities and make great pets.

By Patty Rasmussen

British researchers have found that cats really respond when their owners slow blink at them. It's a great way to improve communication with your cat.

By Valerie Stimac