Pets

Pets make wonderful companions. Learn how to take care of pets, read about common pet behavior issues and injuries and pick up general pet care tips.

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A hybrid cross between a small Asian leopard cat and a domestic cat, the Bengal cat will keep you busy with its intelligence and active personality. It may even shower with you.

By Mark Mancini

The way to a dog's heart is definitely through a belly rub, but just touching a cat's belly will probably get you a back-leg rabbit kick and a painful vise of teeth and claws.

By Laurie L. Dove

Goldfish may seem like an easy starter pet, but they do require some basic care so they don't end up in the toilet a few weeks later! We talk with an expert about the three steps every goldfish owner should take.

By Alia Hoyt

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What do you get when you mix a domestic cat with a wild African serval cat? You get a Savannah cat, which turns out to be a very beautiful but very controversial kitty.

By Mark Mancini

The Maine Coon and the Norwegian Forest are both plus-size breeds of cat, but what are the differences between these feline behemoths?

By Mark Mancini

The belly button is pretty obvious on a human. But what about a dog? Do they have one and if so, where in the world is it?

By Meg Sparwath

Any dog lover with allergies knows that the two just don't mix. So which dog breeds are best if you're allergic and still want a four-legged friend?

By Stephanie Vermillion

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Persians are famous for their long hair and snub noses. But this is no aloof kitty – they're so friendly, breeders refer to them as "dog cats."

By Dave Roos

Affectionate and haughty at the same time, the Siamese cat exudes an air of mystery. But it still loves to follow you around.

By Mark Mancini

According to some sources, Lewis Carroll based the smiling Cheshire Cat from his 1865 novel "Alice's Adventures in Wonderland" on the British Shorthair.

By Mark Mancini

There are two types of huskies and they both look an awful lot like malamutes, so it's no wonder people can't tell them apart.

By Tara Yarlagadda

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The most remarkable feature of a Munchkin cat is its short legs, though most litters have both normal-legged kittens and short-legged kittens.

By Laurie L. Dove

Be prepared to ferret-proof your house! These guys are smart and creative little explorers requiring serious adult supervision.

By Meg Sparwath

The Shar-Pei is one of the most unusual looking dogs around — that is, if you can find the dog under all those adorable wrinkles.

By Patty Rasmussen

Known as the dogs of the cat world, Maine Coons are intelligent, eager to please and love water.

By Laurie L. Dove

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Guinea pigs are small, social and way better than hamsters.

By Kristen Hall-Geisler

The ordinary housecat never seems to get the credit it deserves, even though 95 percent of cats in the U.S. are not purebred. Still these cats have distinctive markings to distinguish them from each other.

By John Perritano

Lovebirds make great pets either alone or in pairs and flourish when they're shown lots of affection.

By Laurie L. Dove

Kittens inherit their coats from their mothers, and no two calico cats look alike. Not even twins.

By Patty Rasmussen

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These wee and fluffy creatures have a bad rap for biting, but you can nip that behavior in the bud with a little training.

By Kristen Hall-Geisler

In rat-infested New York City, the Ryders Alley Trencherfed Society – R.A.T.S – is on the job and prowling the streets with dogs bred and trained to flush out and dispose of pesky rodents.

By Kristen Hall-Geisler

That's mainly because they are low-maintenance and surprisingly lovable.

By Kristen Hall-Geisler

Scratching is a normal feline behavior. That's why many experts advise against putting your cat through a painful and unnecessary declawing procedure.

By John Perritano

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Some Sphynx cats may look like mangled bags of brains, but these so-ugly-they're-cute-cats are among the friendliest of felines.

By John Perritano

The dog days of adolescence are tough on humans. But what about our four-legged friends? Do they deal with similar hormonal changes as they age?

By Meg Sparwath