©2006 Publications International, Ltd. Method B, Step 1a

An important part of cat care is knowing how to transport an injured cat without hurting him or her or making the injury worse. To successfully transport an injured cat, you must remember it has five weapons: the mouth and four claws. An injured cat is likely to also be frightened -- especially if it is being moved -- so great caution must be taken.

If the Cat can be Lifted

Method A

Step 1a: If the cat is cooperative, reach with your right hand over the cat's body and under its chest so the chest is resting in your palm. Lift the cat firmly toward you so its body is secured between your forearm and your body.

Step 1b: Place the cat in a carrier or closed box to transport the cat to the veterinarian.

Step 2a: If the cat is uncooperative, and if you are alone, put a towel or blanket over the cat, including all four paws.

Step 2b: Tie the ends of the towel or blanket together with a cord to form a bag, or place the cat in a carrier or closed box.

Step 2c: Transport the cat to the veterinarian.

If the Cat Needs a Stretcher

Step 1: Use a blanket, a flat board, or a strong piece of cardboard.

Step 1a: If you are using a blanket, place one hand under the cat's chest and the other hand under its rear. Carefully lift or slide the cat onto the blanket.

Step 1b: Grasp each end of the blanket and lift. Try to keep the blanket taut to form a stretcher.

Step 1c: Transport the cat to the veterinarian.

Step 2: If you are using a flat board or strong piece of cardboard:

Step 2a: Place two or three long strips of cloth or rope under the board, avoiding the area where the cat's neck will rest.

©2006 Publications International, Ltd. Method B, Step 2c

Step 2b: Place one hand under the cat's chest and the other under its rear; carefully lift or slide the cat onto the board.

Step 2c: Tie the cat to the board to prevent him or her from falling.

Step 2d: Transport the cat to the veterinarian.

© Publications International, Ltd.