©2006 Publications International, Ltd. Step 1

How to Treat a Dog in Electrical Shock

Grown dogs are seldom victims of electrical shock. But puppies are naturally curious and will chew almost anything, including electrical cords. If the insulation is punctured and the mouth comes in contact with both wires, the dog will receive a shock and may be unable to release the cord.

Electrocution can cause severe heart damage and fluid accumulation in the lungs. Strong shock can stop the heart, and CPR will need to be performed immediately to start the heart beating again. In addition, the dog's mouth will likely be burned from contact with the bare wires. Be sure to watch for signs of shock, which include pale or white gums, a rapid heartbeat, or rapid breathing.

To provide the proper care for your pet who is suffering from electrical shock, use the following tips.

Step 1: If the dog still has the electrical cord in its mouth, DO NOT touch the dog. First remove the plug from its outlet.

Step 2: If the dog is unconscious, check for breathing. If the dog is conscious and breathing, proceed to Step 6. If the dog is not breathing, feel for a heartbeat by placing your fingers about 2 inches behind the elbow in the middle of its chest.

Step 3: If the heart is not beating, proceed to Step 4. If it is, perform artificial respiration.

Step 3a: Turn the dog on its side, and extend its head and neck.

©2006 Publications International, Ltd. Step 2

Step 3b: Hold the dog's mouth and lips closed and blow firmly into its nostrils. Administer 1 breath every 3 to 5 seconds. Take a deep breath, and repeat until you feel resistance or see the chest rise.

Step 3c: After 10 seconds, stop. Watch the dog's chest for movement to indicate the dog is breathing on its own.

Step 3d: If the dog is not breathing, continue artificial respiration.

Step 4: If the heart is not beating, perform CPR.

CPR for Dogs Weighing up to 45 Pounds

Step 4a: Turn the dog on its back.

Step 4b: Kneel down at the head of the dog.

©2006 Publications International, Ltd. Step 4c

Step 4c: Clasp your hands over the dog's chest with your palms resting on either side of its chest.

Step 4d: Compress your palms on the chest firmly for a count of "2," and release for a count of "1." Moderate pressure is required. Repeat about 60 to 90 times per minute.

Step 4e: Alternately (after 30 seconds), hold the dog's mouth and lips closed and blow firmly into its nostrils. Blow for 3 seconds, take a deep breath, and repeat until you feel resistance or see the dog's chest rise. Try to repeat this 10 to 20 times per minute. As a general rule, use a CPR ratio of about 5 heart compressions to 1 breath of air.

Step 4f: After 1 minute, stop. Look at the chest for breathing movement, and feel for a heartbeat by placing fingers about 2 inches behind the dog's elbow in the center of its chest.

Step 4g: If the dog's heart is not beating, continue CPR. If the heart starts beating, but the dog is still not breathing, return to Step 3.

CPR for Dogs Weighing More Than 45 Pounds

Step 4a: Turn the dog on its side.

Step 4b: Place the palm of your hand in the middle of the dog's chest.

©2006 Publications International, Ltd. Step 4b

Step 4c: Press for a count of "2," and release for a count of "1." Firm pressure is required. Repeat about 60 to 90 times per minute.

Step 4d: Alternately (after 30 seconds), hold the dog's mouth and lips closed and blow firmly into its nostrils. Blow for 3 seconds, take a deep breath, and repeat until you feel resistance or see the chest rise. Try to repeat this 10 to 20 times per minute.

Step 4e: After 1 minute, stop. Look at the chest for breathing movement, and feel for a heartbeat by placing your fingers about 2 inches behind the dog's elbow in the center of its chest.

Step 4f: If the dog's heart is not beating, continue CPR. If the heart starts beating but the dog is still not breathing, return to Step 3.

Step 5: Transport the dog immediately to the veterinarian. CPR or artificial respiration should be continued until the dog is breathing and its heart is beating without assistance.

Step 6: If the dog's mouth or lips are burned (bright red), swab them gently with 3% hydrogen peroxide.

Step 7: To conserve body heat, wrap the dog in a blanket or jacket.

Just like humans, dogs often have problems with their eyes due to dust, allergies, and other culprits. See the next page for tips on dealing with eye injuries.