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How to Give First Aid to Your Dog

        Animals | Dog Care

How to Treat a Dog That Has Smoke or Carbon Monoxide Inhalation
©2006 Publications International, Ltd. Step 2

Fires are another possible threat to dogs. Do not risk your own life to save your dog. Leave that task to the firefighters or those trained in rescue.

The signs of smoke or carbon monoxide inhalation include depression, lack of coordination, heavy panting, deep red gums, and possible convulsions. Also watch for signs of shock, which are pale or white gums, a rapid heartbeat, or rapid breathing.

If suspect your pet is suffering from smoke or carbon monoxide inhalation, use the following tips to provide the dog with proper care.

If the Dog Is Conscious

Step 1: Remove the dog from the area and into fresh air immediately.

Step 2: Flush the dog's eyes thoroughly with saline solution or clean water.

Step 3: Transport the dog immediately to the veterinarian.

If the Dog Is Unconscious

Step 1: Remove the dog from the area and into fresh air immediately.

Step 2: If the dog is not breathing, feel for a heartbeat by placing your fingers about 2 inches behind the dog's elbow in the middle of its chest.

©2006 Publication International, Ltd. Step 2

Step 3: If the heart is not beating, proceed to Step 4. If it is, perform artificial respiration.

Step 3a: Turn the dog on its side.

Step 3b: Hold the dog's mouth and lips closed and blow firmly into its nostrils. Administer 1 breath every 3 to 5 seconds. Take a deep breath, and repeat until you feel resistance or see the dog's chest rise.

Step 3c: After 1 minute, stop. Watch the chest for movement to indicate the dog is breathing on its own.

Step 3d: If the dog is not breathing, continue artificial respiration.

Step 4: If the heart is not beating, perform cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR).

CPR for Dogs Weighing up to 45 Pounds

Step 4a: Turn the dog on its back.

Step 4b: Kneel down at the head of the dog.

Step 4c: Clasp your hands over the dog's chest with your palms resting on either side of its chest.

©2006 Publications International, Ltd. Step 4e

Step 4d: Compress your palms on the chest firmly for a count of "2," and release for a count of "1." Moderate pressure is required. Repeat about 60 to 90 times per minute.

Step 4e: Alternately (after 30 seconds), hold the dog's mouth and lips closed and blow firmly into its nostrils. Blow for 3 seconds, take a deep breath, and repeat until you feel resistance or see the dog's chest rise. Try to repeat this 10 to 20 times per minute. As a general rule, use a CPR ratio of about 5 heart compressions to 1 breath of air.

Step 4f: After 1 minute, stop. Look at the chest for breathing movement, and feel for a heartbeat by placing your fingers about 2 inches behind the dog's elbow in the center of its chest.

Step 4g: If the dog's heart is not beating, continue CPR. If the heart starts beating, but the dog is still not breathing, return to Step 3.

CPR for Dogs Weighing More Than 45 Pounds

Step 4a: Turn the dog on its side.

©2006 Publications International, Ltd. Step 4b

Step 4b: Place the palm of your hand in the middle of the dog's chest.

Step 4c: Press for a count of "2," and release for a count of "1." Firm pressure is required. Repeat about 60 to 90 times per minute.

Step 4d: Alternately (after 30 seconds), hold the dog's mouth and lips closed and blow firmly into its nostrils. Blow for 3 seconds, take a deep breath, and repeat until you feel resistance or see the chest rise. Try to repeat this 10 to 20 times per minute.

Step 4e: After 1 minute, stop. Look at the chest for breathing movement, and feel for a heartbeat by placing your fingers about 2 inches behind the dog's elbow in the center of its chest.

Step 4f: If the dog's heart is not beating, continue CPR. If the heart starts beating but the dog is still not breathing, return to Step 3.

Step 5: Transport the dog immediately to the veterinarian. CPR or artificial respiration should be continued on the way to the veterinarian or until the dog is breathing and its heart is beating without assistance.

A puncture wound can be quite painful and traumatic for a dog. In the next section, we'll learn how to treat this type of injury.


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