Insects and Arachnids

Insects and arachnids are the most popular wild animal on Earth. Read our collection of articles discussing all sorts of ants, bugs, butterflies, spiders and just about every other type of insect and arachnid.

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Not all spiders spin webs, but the eight-legged arachnids that do, spin all kinds of different webs, some big, some small.

By Mark Mancini

These nasty pests are developing cross-resistance to multiple classes of insecticides.

By Kristen Hall-Geisler

Just like bees, wasps are pollinators that are also endangered. But you rarely hear anyone pleading to save wasps. A new study finds out why wasps are despised by the public and researchers alike.

By Dave Roos

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Ninety percent of brown recluse bites don't have any effect at all — but the mythology around these creatures and their bites is legendary.

By Jesslyn Shields

Is the "banana spider" you're looking at the one that sits around harmlessly catching flies, or could its bite kill a small child? If we rely solely on common names, this question is complicated.

By Jesslyn Shields

These nasty little bugs have been reported in 28 U.S. states and can cause an illness called Chagas disease.

By Michelle Konstantinovsky

These arachnids are aggressive, unbelievably fast and love to murder ants for no reason, but don't worry — they're harmless.

By Jesslyn Shields

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If you think the answer is 1,000, you're way way off.

By Danielle Douez

Wolf spiders might find their way into your house and can look threatening, but they're really harmless.

By Jesslyn Shields

After years in decline, monarchs made a spectacular comeback in 2019. Why's that — and will it continue?

By Maria Trimarchi

The world's largest bee, lost to science for 38 years, has been rediscovered on a remote island in Indonesia.

By Jesslyn Shields

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There's an old saying that you catch more flies with honey than vinegar. Scientists have now found out why sour tastes are so repellent to flies.

By Alia Hoyt

Bee vaccines might be key to our food security.

By Jesslyn Shields

There are lots of theories. Maybe fluorescence helps them find each other in the dark?

By Jesslyn Shields

Think a teeny tiny ant can't pack a punch? Think again. The Dracula ant can subdue its prey so fast, they never know it's coming.

By John Donovan

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How do small headhunter ants decapitate larger, fiercer trap-jaw ants? And why do they do it?

By Loraine Fick

The American cockroach places a well-aimed karate kick to keep the jewel wasp from turning it into a zombified husk of wasp chow. That's what a new study found anyway.

By Nathan Chandler

Justin O. Schmidt studies insect venom and has a rating system for the relative agony inflicted by the world's most painful stings. Which is the worst?

By Jesslyn Shields

Structures in some butterflies' wings are actually part of their ears.

By Jesslyn Shields

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Thanks to a citizen science project in the path of totality, researchers studied bee activity and were surprised by the results.

By John Perritano

For five nights in a row, a praying mantis came to the same garden spot to hunt for fish, completely confounding scientists.

By Jesslyn Shields

Beekeeping, when you get down to it, is the art and science of removing honey from hardworking bees without them missing it. But beekeeping is about so much more than just the honey.

By Dave Roos

The tiny fly cocoons are between 34 and 40 million years old and contained well-preserved parasitic fossils.

By Mark Mancini

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A Columbia University scientist stumbled upon the first of seven new spiders while hunting for local frogs.

By Mark Mancini

The Asian longhorned tick has shown up in six states so far, and nobody knows how it got here.

By Mark Mancini