Wild Animals

Whether they crawl, fly, swim, slither, walk, run or pounce, wild animals rely on their instincts. Read about all kinds of wild animals, mammals, birds, fish, insects, reptiles and amphibians.


Watch out if you want a bite of this bad boy. The Asian common toad has been spotted in Madagascar, and conservation ecologists are worried sick about it.

You can't tell a book by its cover, and you can't tell a squid by its Nosferatu getup.

Sea spiders don't do anything by the book, and researchers have just gotten to the bottom of how they breathe.

Once you accept squirrels aren't going anywhere, you can apply a more creative approach to keeping the critters away from your prized tomatoes.

It's easy to mistake a crow for a raven or vice versa. But the two birds are actually pretty different.

A new study seems to suggest that sharks prefer jazz to classical music but the researchers set us straight.

Researchers have successfully used RNA to transfer a memory from one sea snail to another.

African Matabele ants always take the quickest route back to headquarters, which may not be the shortest path.

Spontaneous sex reversal in chickens is pretty rare, but it does happen. Find out how Miss Lucille became Mr. Lucille.

Think your bed is cleaner than a chimp's? Researchers at North Carolina State University set out to find the answer.

Koala populations in Australia are in decline, in part due to the ravages of chlamydia, a sexually transmitted bacterial infection.

Oak processionary moth caterpillars can trigger allergic reactions causing everything from eye irritation to anaphylactic shock.

By incorporating algae into their bodies, these beautiful sea slugs become one of the few animals with the photosynthetic ability of a plant.

Snails can't pick and choose their shells like hermit crabs can. In fact, eviction means death. So how do those hard shells form over snails?

So-called "exploding ants" protect their colony and its territory by rupturing their bodies and sending out a sticky stream of poisonous gel.

Scientists have identified a substance responsible for breaking down pesticides in bees, which will help them come up with a bee-friendlier bug spray.

The pelican spider would just as soon eat another spider as look at one.

It pays to be brainy when you're a ring-tailed lemur.

Male brown widow spiders stubbornly court the oldest females they can find, though younger females are more fertile and far less dangerous.

Most of the scientific attention to birdsong has been paid to the male of the species. But many female birds sing too — and scientists are starting to understand how important it is to study them as well.

The platypus may look a bit absurd and bizarre, but its milk might hold the secret to fighting antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

Nutria are jumbo-sized rodents that reproduce and eat at a jumbo-sized pace.

A species of termite-hunting sub-Saharan ants tend to their wounded.

Cuttlefish can avoid detection by holding a disguise for long periods of time.

Urban coyotes have a fierce and formidable reputation as midnight predators, but coexistence with humans is possible.