Reptiles

Reptiles are cold-blooded vertebrates that have scales layered over their skin. Common reptiles include lizards, snakes, alligators and crocodiles.

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Although New Guinea's Papuan olive python is nonvenomous, its color-changing camouflage and mighty constriction make it an excellent hunter.

By Desiree Bowie

The highly adaptable amethystine python is a nocturnal predator that's able to make itself at home in tropical rainforest, mountains and other landscapes.

By Desiree Bowie

The Cuban boa finds shelter in trees and gives birth to live young rather than laying eggs. The oldest Cuban boa is over 30 years old.

By Desiree Bowie

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The yellow anaconda isn't the only snake species to form breeding balls for mating privileges, but it will engage in the ritual for several hours or even days.

By Desiree Bowie

The Indian python was once considered a subspecies of the Burmese python. Now that the former is recognized as its own distinct species, it faces endangerment.

By Desiree Bowie

The king brown snake, also known as the mulga, occupies many regions of Australia and is partial to the most arid regions.

By Desiree Bowie

The African rock python has a diet of large animals that include crocodiles and warthogs. Learn how this giant snake is capable of eating even larger prey.

By Desiree Bowie

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The eastern indigo snake takes advantage of a unique shelter that provides much-needed protection to the endangered species and its young.

By Desiree Bowie

The green anaconda hunts both in water and on dry land, which is even scarier when you realize the snake is capable of eating prey larger than its own body.

By Desiree Bowie

The boa constrictor is a large, nonvenomous snake known for squeezing the life from its prey. They are not considered to be at a high risk of extinction.

By Desiree Bowie

The Burmese python is a solitary and nocturnal creature, but it's become an invasive species in Florida as a result of the exotic pet trade.

By Desiree Bowie

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The king cobra (Ophiophagus hannah) is the longest venomous snake in the world and is one of the few snake species to make a nest for its eggs.

By Desiree Bowie

Pythons, the longest snakes in the world, are nonvenomous with a lethal squeeze. These snakes constrict their prey before devouring the meal.

By Desiree Bowie

One of the largest crocodiles ever was so big that one website called the species "bus-sized."

By Yara Simón

Just one bite from any of these venomous snakes could cost you your life. They're some of the deadliest snakes in the world and you don't want to mess with them.

By Sharise Cunningham

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A new study dispels the myth that snakes are deaf to airborne sounds and reveals that different species react differently to the sounds they hear.

By Christina N. Zdenek

While you may not want to encounter one on a hike, there's no denying that snakes are magnificent creatures — no matter how big or small they are. But when it comes to the biggest snakes in the world, nature truly knows no bounds.

By Mark Mancini & Desiree Bowie

Turtles, whether giant land tortoises, sea turtles or the pet turtle in your aquarium, tend to be omnivores and love a varied vegetarian and protein diet.

By Laurie L. Dove

Welcome to the wild, wild world of dual penises, delayed fertilization, mama python incubators and springtime "mating balls."

By Mark Mancini

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If you're looking for the venomous timber rattler, the U.S. is the place to be, as these bad boys are found in at least 27 states.

By Mark Mancini

Often confused with the venomous coral snake, which advertises its toxicity through bright bands of color, the milk snake is harmless to humans.

By Mark Mancini

Pit vipers also carry venom in twin glands behind their eyes, delivered through movable fangs that can be folded up against the roof of their mouth.

By Mark Mancini

These snakes are some of the best reptilian actors you'll ever meet, but don't let the act fool you.

By Mark Mancini

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To some, the thought of snakes flying through the air is the scariest thought imaginable, but, as we'll explain, flying snakes don't actually fly, they "fall with style."

By Mark Mancini

Despite their name, rat snakes don't eat just rodents. This huge family of snakes, which lives on every continent except Antarctica, also eats lizards and amphibians.

By Mark Mancini