Fish

Fish are an incredibly diverse group of animals. Read these articles to find out about all kinds of unique and different fish.

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Porbeagles are related to great whites, but while they're also athletic killers, they're smaller and far less ferocious. And what's with the funny dog name?

By Mark Mancini

Decades before Discovery started its wildly successful Shark Week, Americans were transfixed by stories of shark-infested waters.

By Janet M. Davis

The showy lionfish is a stunning beauty. But this invasive species, which was released into the wild in the 1980s, is wreaking havoc on delicate reef ecosystems worldwide.

By Wendy Bowman

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The lemon shark isn't as aggressive as some other sharks and it isn't quite as yellow as its name suggests.

By Katie Carman

This denizen of the frigid deep not only lives a crazy long life, it also can grow up to 24 feet in length and eating its flesh can make humans "shark drunk."

By Katie Carman

Most species of the rarely seen anglerfish live up to a mile beneath the ocean, where the females lure prey with a head-dangling hook appendage and permanently fuse with male suitors. It doesn't get much stranger than that.

By Katie Carman

The swordfish's nose might look crazy weird, but these gladiators of the sea are perfectly outfitted for ocean battle.

By Jesslyn Shields

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The snakehead fish can breathe air, double its population in 15 months and has a huge appetite, which is not a good thing for native species.

By Jesslyn Shields

Humuhumunukunukuapua'a, the colorful little fish with the craaaaazy long name, is Hawaii's state fish, but it wasn't always.

By Jesslyn Shields

The basking shark, an endangered species, may look like a fearsome predator, but is actually a filter-feeder, gathering zooplankton and other tiny animals, such as shrimp, in bulk as it roams the seas with a wide open mouth.

By Mark Mancini

Piranhas are some of the most feared fish in the world, but is their reputation for ferocity a bit overblown?

By Jesslyn Shields

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They're swimming in water all day so how could they ever get thirsty? The answer might surprise you.

By Nathan Chandler

The prehistoric looking alligator gar is sometimes referred to as a "living fossil" and, while it may look threatening, it's harmless to anything larger than itself.

By Michelle Konstantinovsky

The colorful superstars of backyard water gardens are actually ornamental varietals of domesticated carp.

By Michelle Konstantinovsky

It's one of the gentle giants of the sea. It loves sunbathing, dining on crabs and taking deep dives to the ocean floor.

By Mark Mancini

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The blobfish is actually pretty average looking in its normal habitat.

By Jesslyn Shields

The cleaner wrasse fish passed the mirror test, which is considered the gold standard for determining self-awareness.

By Michelle Konstantinovsky

Scientific divers from the California Academy of Sciences discover new species of dazzling, neon-colored fish.

By Michelle Konstantinovsky

Commercial fisheries accidentally kill around 100 million — yes, 100 million — sharks each year. The solution to this problem might lie in magnets.

By Jesslyn Shields

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A new study seems to suggest that sharks prefer jazz to classical music but the researchers set us straight.

By Alia Hoyt

Cuttlefish can avoid detection by holding a disguise for long periods of time.

By Amanda Onion

The Gulf corvina is the loudest fish on the planet, helping lead to its overfishing and endangerment.

By Jesslyn Shields

Scientists have long known that much of the world's farmed salmon was deaf. Now they know why.

By Alia Hoyt

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Scientists have known for a long time that goldfish make their own alcohol. Now, they've just discovered how they do it.

By Alia Hoyt

Michael Phelps is racing a shark for TV glory. But does he have a fighting (or swimming) chance?

By Dave Roos