Mammals

Scientifically-speaking there are 11 mammal groups, and most Mammals are warm-blooded, have body hair, give live birth and nurse their young with milk from mammary glands. Check out these articles about all kinds of mammals.

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Never heard of the tarsier? Well it's one of the smallest primates in the world but has some of the biggest bug eyes you've ever seen.

By Allison Troutner

Leopard seals are the second largest species of seal in the Antarctic after the southern elephant seal. They're fast, powerful and eat basically anything that moves. Their only natural predator? The killer whale.

By Jesslyn Shields

An orangutan who could unscrew bolts to bust out? A gorilla who climbed the vines out of her enclosure to just roam the zoo? These are wild animals, and these are their wild escape stories.

By Allison Troutner

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Pine martens are elusive and love to stay hidden in deep forests, but with strong claws, they are great climbers and hunters.

By Katie Carman

Marmosets are some of the smallest monkeys in the world and are found primarily in the forested areas of central Brazil. And the males support their mates in a very unique way.

By Patty Rasmussen

A federal judge reversed a Trump administration ruling that removed the gray wolf from the Endangered Species Act. Here's why.

By Logan Smith

Kodiak bears are some of the largest bears in the world and live only in the islands of the Kodiak Archipelago in Alaska.

By Jesslyn Shields

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Hibernating mammals like ground squirrels can build some muscle mass during their big sleep, with the help of gut bacteria.

By Jesslyn Shields

The adorable vaquita, the world's smallest porpoise and rarest marine mammal, has been pushed to virtual extinction by greed and fishing nets.

By Katie Carman

Pallas's cats appear cantankerous, in part due to their flat faces and large, owl-like eyes with round pupils.

By Katie Carman

The boxing kangaroo as a symbol of the Australian fighting spirit dates back to the 1890s, but what's the truth? Do kangaroos actually box?

By Jesslyn Shields

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Scientists have found striking parallels between the babbling produced by greater sac-winged bat pups and the babbling baby sounds of human infants.

By Ahana Aurora Fernandez

Leucistic squirrels are rare, but Brevard, North Carolina has a thriving population.

By Jesslyn Shields

You read that right. Fruit bats are instrumental in pollinating hundreds of plants, including the agave, a key ingredient in tequila.

By Mark Mancini

With a little pig snout and the locomotion of a kangaroo, these tiny desert rodents hardly ever drink water and rarely urinate.

By Jesslyn Shields

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Humpback whales can be as long as a city bus and weigh as much as two. They love to breach and water slap with their fins and tails, making them a perennial favorite for whale watchers.

By Katie Carman

Tiger deaths and injuries from vehicle collisions are still rare but they're increasing. Conservationists want to use GPS collars to track the tigers and understand how transportation infrastructure affects their biology and ecology.

By Neil Carter

It's a behavior synonymous with gorillas — beating the chest. But why do they do it? Researchers think they've figured out what the purpose is behind that pounding.

By Sharise Cunningham

They look a lot like beavers and the two rodents have a lot in common. But muskrats are their own species with their own signature scent.

By Meg Sparwath

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Badgers love to dig — one den, or "sett," in southern England is thought to cover a territory of over a square mile and have up to 100 entrances.

By Jesslyn Shields

Red squirrels have a big attitude, which might have to due with their small size. They have to act big. And they do so with noisy and aggressive behavior.

By Mark Mancini

When threatened, the slow loris licks venom secreted from a gland under its arm. Licked and loaded, the loris is ready to poison an attacker with a bite.

By Patty Rasmussen

There are over 60 species of langur in the world, all of which eat a plant-based diet and most of which burp a lot.

By Wendy Bowman

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These chunky little guys aren't dogs at all. They're actually part of the rodent family, and they're shockingly smart.

By Meg Sparwath

The name dik-dik comes from the repetitive 'dik' sound the tiny female dik-dik makes when she feels threatened.

By Patty Rasmussen