Primates

Primates are placental mammals that include gorillas, monkeys and chimpanzees, as well as humans. Other than humans, primates are found mostly in Central and South America, Africa, and South Asia.

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It's a behavior synonymous with gorillas — beating the chest. But why do they do it? Researchers think they've figured out what the purpose is behind that pounding.

By Sharise Cunningham

When threatened, the slow loris licks venom secreted from a gland under its arm. Licked and loaded, the loris is ready to poison an attacker with a bite.

By Patty Rasmussen

There are over 60 species of langur in the world, all of which eat a plant-based diet and most of which burp a lot.

By Wendy Bowman

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Spider monkeys, an endangered species, are the largest monkeys in the Americas and live in the forest canopy, where they swing through the trees with the greatest of ease.

By Jesslyn Shields

Gorillas can live to be about 35 to 40 years old and are much gentler (and much sleepier) than you might think.

By Jesslyn Shields

Those red butts on baboons do serve a purpose, sort of, but it's probably not quite what you think.

By Kristen Hall-Geisler

Orphaned Bornean orangutans need all the help they can get — the Borneo Orangutan Survival Foundation steps in to teach them the art of survival.

By Jesslyn Shields

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It may seem like just the cutest thing in the world to you, but owning a pet monkey is a really bad idea. Here's why.

By Tara Yarlagadda

A group of researchers in Shennongjia National Nature Reserve discovered that these female monkeys are essentially happy to feed each other's offspring.

By Jamie Allen

Think your bed is cleaner than a chimp's? Researchers at North Carolina State University set out to find the answer.

By Kristen Hall-Geisler

It pays to be brainy when you're a ring-tailed lemur.

By Jesslyn Shields

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Some people mistakenly believe that if chimps are socialized from an early age, they're not a threat to humans. But these five families found out the hard way that chimps will always be chimps.

By Nathan Chandler

We've learned that young orangutans nurse for much longer than any other mammal, knowledge which could help conservation efforts.

By Jesslyn Shields

Scientists hope to eliminate need for tagging, extend system to other wild animals.

By Melanie Radzicki McManus

Turns out the reboot of 'Planet of the Apes' got one thing right — it's the brains monkeys lack, not the anatomy.

By Jesslyn Shields

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The most popular lady macaques show us why nitpicking pays off.

By Jesslyn Shields

We do it. Chimps do it. A new study out of Japan investigates just how far back on the evolutionary ladder this totally adorable behavior goes.

By Christopher Hassiotis

Researchers developed technology that allows monkeys to maneuver around in robotic wheelchairs, using only their thoughts to navigate. That has implications for humanity.

By Patrick J. Kiger

Feral monkeys have roamed Silver Springs State Park in Florida since the 1930s.

By Karen Kirkpatrick

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"The Jinx." "Making a Murderer." And now, orangutans? Why this female-on-female ape killing took researchers by surprise — and reads like a human true-crime drama.

By Jesslyn Shields

Pop culture has depicted chimps and other primates as both gun-wielding villains and saviors, but should humans be concerned about the possibility of armed apes?

By Karen Kirkpatrick

Monkeys share a lot in common with us, but are they just as superstitious? We know that have the ability to gamble, but is it deeper than just a game to them.

By Laurie L. Dove

A long, long time ago, lemurs lived all over the world. But something happened to kill them off — everywhere except in Madagascar. How did the island protect them from extinction?

By Sarah Winkler

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Besides our genetic similarities, gorillas also share our love of getting a good night's sleep -- except that their alarm clocks come in the form of dangerous predators and poachers.

By Cristen Conger

Orangutans might be the most low-key of the world's apes, but that doesn't mean they don't like to socialize. So are these redheads miscast as loners, or are orangutans introverts?

By Jennifer Horton