Marsupials

Marsupials are mammals that commonly bear a pouch such as Kangaroos and Koala Bears. Two thirds of marsupial species are found in Australia.

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The boxing kangaroo as a symbol of the Australian fighting spirit dates back to the 1890s, but what's the truth? Do kangaroos actually box?

By Jesslyn Shields

The smallest of the wallaby species is known to pose for selfies with tourists and be cuter than cute. But the feisty quokka has had to fight for its very survival.

By Jesslyn Shields

They look so cute and fluffy, but koalas have a fierce side too. Still, their biggest threat to survival is mankind.

By Alia Hoyt

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These adorable marsupials look as sweet as their name. But what, exactly, are sugar gliders?

By Jamie Allen

Sure, opossums eat out of your trashcan, but they're also strange little superheroes.

By Jesslyn Shields

Koala populations in Australia are in decline, in part due to the ravages of chlamydia, a sexually transmitted bacterial infection.

By Carrie Tatro

Tasmanian devils are scrappy little marsupials with jaws as strong as tigers'. But a deadly form of cancer is threatening to annihilate the species. Can the devils be saved before it's too late?

By Alia Hoyt & Cristen Conger

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Perhaps just as puzzling as the Rubik's Cube (though not as colorful), the purpose of wombat scat's geometrical shape seems mysterious. So what's the scoop on wombat poop?

By Cristen Conger

Marsupials are mammals that commonly bear a pouch such as kangaroos and koalas. Did you know that two thirds of marsupial species are found in Australia? Find out more by viewing this marsupial image gallery.

By Marie Bobel

Million-dollar endorsement deals or a sneaker named the Air Roo aren't in the cards for kangaroos. Since these animals can't play in any Final Four championships, why do they hop?

By Cristen Conger

If you can get past a koala's pungent scent of urine and mating-musk, you might detect a faint hint of cough drops. Why do koalas smell like they'd clear out your sinuses?

By Julia Layton

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If you want to determine whether you've got your hands on a wallaby or a kangaroo, you're going to have to pry open the animal's mouth and examine its molars.

By Jennifer Horton