Marine Life

Marine life includes an incredible and vibrant array of wild animals that live in the ocean. From tiny phytoplankton to massive blue whales, marine life is a vital source of food, energy and life for the entire planet.

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It's a slippery proposition, to be sure, but bees do it, birds do it and you can bet that eels do it too. The question is, how do eels reproduce?

By Mark Mancini

Sailfish are the fastest known animal in the ocean. Just how fast? As fast as a cheetah. That's how fast.

By Cherise Threewitt

Cymothoa exigua will make you feel very glad you're not a fish.

By Jesslyn Shields

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These massive mollusks are one of the world's most invasive species. They have the potential to devastate Florida's agriculture. Oh, and they can cause meningitis in humans.

By Sarah Gleim

Cone snails are marine animals that harpoon their prey and incapacitate them with deadly toxins. They may be beautiful, but they are highly venomous.

By Jesslyn Shields

Tons of these humongous bug-like creatures live in the darkest depths of the sea, but they are still somewhat of a mystery to us humans.

By Jennifer Walker-Journey

Even washed up on the beach, the Portuguese man-of-war can deliver searing pain with its stinging tentacles, so whatever you do, don't touch it.

By Mark Mancini

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You might not think a worm could be longer than a whale, but allow us to introduce you to the bootlace worm, one of the longest animals on the planet. And, oh and it packs a potent toxin, too.

By Mark Mancini

Looks can be deceiving. That's definitely true for the blue-ringed octopus. It's tiny, stunningly beautiful and looks harmless. Yet its venom could kill 26 men in minutes.

By Stephanie Parker

The pistol shrimp is feared in the ocean for its ability to hit a prey with air bubbles that travel 82 feet per second, pop at 218 decibels and deliver 8,000 degrees Fahrenheit of heat.

By Katie Carman

Yes, this terrifying worm was named after the infamous Bobbitt case. And with good reason.

By Francisco Guzman

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These brightly colored crustaceans can smash aquarium glass or quickly cut through a human finger, so whatever you do, keep your distance.

By Stephanie Vermillion

These two sea creatures can be easy to confuse. But they're actually quite different. We talked to experts to find out how to tell them apart.

By Wendy Bowman

Roly-poly bugs are natural soil conditioners because they process decomposing matter, helping keep your garden soil clean and healthy. And — fun fact — they're crustaceans, not insects.

By Jeremy Glass

This master of camouflage can count, gender-bend and also use a hidden weapon to outsmart its enemies.

By Alia Hoyt

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What lives in water, has no gills, scales or fins and is not a fish? Yep, a starfish — which is why marine biologists have renamed these creatures sea stars.

By Wendy Bowman

A bright pink manta ray named Inspector Clouseau is causing a splash on the runway of the Great Barrier Reef.

By Jesslyn Shields

Proactive sluggishness, along with the ability to squeeze into tight spaces, keeps these slugs safe from predators like birds, toads and, well, fires.

By Katie Carman

Dwindling natural habitats are causing a significant decline in certain seahorse species. To bolster populations, researchers in Australia are building seahorse hotels and leaving the lights on.

By Wendy Bowman

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What sea creature looks like a spiny pincushion and is considered a delicacy to gastronomes around the world? Yep, the sea urchin.

By Jeremy Glass

These saltwater clams are the largest on the planet, and some can live as long as 100 years. And despite their, well, looks, they're pretty darn tasty.

By Kristen Hall-Geisler

Rumors of giant squid have terrified sailors for centuries, but new technology is now helping to bring these mysterious creatures up toward the light.

By Michelle Konstantinovsky

Most jellyfish are more bothersome than threatening, but the box jellyfish is so poisonous you might not make it out of the water alive.

By John Perritano

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Is that a dolphin pancreas? Some extremely firm manatee vomit? Nope, it's sea pork!

By Jesslyn Shields

The biggest land-dwelling arthropod can crack into everything from coconuts to carcasses, but they're also really vulnerable.

By Jesslyn Shields