Like HowStuffWorks on Facebook!

Insects

While there are a million different types of insects, all have a hard exoskeleton which is segmented into three parts. In fact the word "insect" is derived from the Latin meaning segmented.


Living Near the Equator Is Seriously Risky (For Caterpillars)

Why did scientists plant dummy caterpillars around the world? Learn more about this study on arthropod predation in this HowStuffWorks article. See more »

How the Ladybug Folds Its Giant Wings

Researchers have captured the secret to how ladybugs tuck in their ginormous wings. Learn more at HowStuffWorks. See more »

Scientists Discover Caterpillar That Actually Eats Plastic

A chance scientific discovery could help rid the planet of one of its biggest environmental problems -- plastic. HowStuffWorks looks at the findings. See more »

Female Dragonflies Fake Death to Avoid Unwanted Male Advances

How does the female moorland hawker dragonfly ward off unwanted mating advances? Learn about dragonflies playing dead in this HowStuffWorks article. See more »

Teaching Bees to Play Ball Reveals Complex Learning Abilities

How can bees exhibit complex learning abilities? Learn about bees using ball tools for goals in this HowStuffWorks article. See more »

Is That a Cricket in Your Cocktail?

You can now drink your bugs thanks to a company called Critter Bitters. HowStuffWorks Now explains. See more »

Newly Discovered Desert Bee Species Are Curiously Ant-like

New species of bees discovered in the Southwestern U.S. resemble ants. Learn more about this ant-like bee genus in this HowStuffWorks Now article. See more »

Newly Discovered Crane Fly Species: Tiny Wings, Double-barreled Penis

An Australian scientist has found an unusual species of crane fly with special properties. HowStuffWorks Now investigates. See more »

Flesh-eating Screwworm Maggots Are Devouring Rare Tiny Florida Deer Alive

The flesh-eating screwworm has been found in the Florida Keys. Learn more about screwworms and Key deer in this HowStuffWorks Now article. See more »

Gay Termites Plot the Death of Kings

New research finds that male termites without mates will pair up to nest. Things get interesting, though, once females are around for mating. See more »