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Could ancient Aztecs have held the secret to fending off shark attacks?

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  • Andrews, Jean. "Peppers: The Domesticated Capsicum." University of Texas Press. 1995. (June 13, 2008)http://books.google.com/books?id=SsjvX31EMekC
  • Bavley, Alan. "Ancient eaters liked it hot, too: Chilies date back 6,000 years, making them one of the oldest domesticated foods in the Americas." Knight Ridder Tribune Business News. Feb. 16, 2007. (June 11, 2008)
  • Brown, David. "One Hot Archeological Find." The Washington Post. Feb. 16, 2007. (June 11, 2008)http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2007/02/15/AR2007021502130.html
  • Hussein, Wasbir. "World's Hottest Chili Used as Elephant Repellent." National Geographic. Nov. 20, 2007. (June 11, 2008)http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2007/11/071120-AP-india-elephants.html
  • Matos, Gonzalo Ramos and Romero, Felix Eduardo. "Capsicum shark repellent." United States. Application number 11/179,118. July 12, 2005. (June 11, 2008)http://www.google.com/patents?id=ucKaAAAAEBAJ&dq=Capsicum+shark+repellent
  • Parker, Jane and Parker, Steve. "The Encyclopedia of Sharks." Firefly Books. 2002.
  • Perry, Linda and Flannery, Kent V. "Precolumbian use of chili peppers in the Valley of Oaxaca, Mexico." July 17, 2007. (June 11, 2008)http://www.pnas.org/cgi/content/abstract/104/29/11905

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