How Caterpillars Work

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Why do we study bugs?

Why do we study bugs?

There are many reasons why we study bugs, from protecting crops to preventing the spread of disease. Learn more about why we study bugs at HowStuffWorks.


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  • Bessin, Ric. "Stinging Caterpillars." University of Kentucky College of Agriculture. 1/2004 (4/22/2008) http://www.ca.uky.edu/entomology/entfacts/ef003.asp
  • Blackiston, Douglas J. et al. "Retention of Memory through Metamorphosis: Can a Moth Remember what it Learned as a Caterpillar?" PLoS One. Vol. 3, issue 3. March 2008.
  • Collman, Sharon J. "Biology and Control of Tent Caterpillars." Washington State University. (4/22/2008) http://gardening.wsu.edu/library/inse003/inse003.htm
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  • Musser, Richard O. et al. "Caterpillar Saliva Beats Plant Defenses." Nature. Vol. 416. 4/11/2002
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