Animal Facts

Learn about some of the strange and unusual facts and terms in the animal kingdom.

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It's hard to say which animal is the most dangerous of all. We're not comparing apples to apples. But when it comes to deadly animals, these four have to be at the top the list.

By Alia Hoyt

These intelligent, friendly creatures have a life span of 15 to 20 years and make great pets.

By Patty Rasmussen

Your dog barking at the mailman? Loud. But he's got nothing on these five. They're some of the loudest animals on the planet, and they're probably not the ones you'd expect.

By Kristen Hall-Geisler

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You probably like a lot of Animalia (that's the scientific name for animals), but how well do you know their formal monikers? Every animal has a two-part Latin name, with the first word capitalized, for classification purposes.

By Alia Hoyt

A zorse is one strange looking horse. That's because it's the product of a zebra stallion and a female horse.

By Jesslyn Shields

Kiddo was his name and not only was he the first cat to attempt to cross the Atlantic in an airship, but he also did it as a stowaway.

By John Donovan

The two words mean very different things and are often used incorrectly. We'll clear up the confusion.

By Kristen Hall-Geisler

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The Gila monster is the most venomous lizard on U.S. soil. But despite the fact that its bite can be debilitating, its venom can also save lives.

By Mark Mancini

We know dogs have been trained to sniff out everything from burglars to bombs. Now a group of researchers is hoping some savvy canines can help detect coronavirus, too.

By Stephanie Vermillion

More than 70 percent of pet owners play music for their pets so Spotify has created custom playlists just for your furry friends (and your favorite iguanas, too).

By Kristen Hall-Geisler

The grudge match that was popularized in Rudyard Kipling's short story "Rikki-Tikki-Tavi" is a mystifying one, but a few specialized traits allow mongooses to add venomous snakes to their list of entrées.

By Jesslyn Shields

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The green iguana isn't native to the Sunshine State. So how did this invasive lizard get there and become the state's menace to society?

By Mark Mancini

Gastroliths, or "stomach stones," are found in animals from chickens to sea lions. But what are they for?

By Jesslyn Shields

Animal sanctuaries should provide animals with excellent care for the rest of their lives. But many don't. So how do you know if a sanctuary is legit?

By Stephanie Vermillion

In some parts of the U.S., the woolly bear caterpillar's color bands tell how bad a winter will be – lots of black means a harsh winter. So, is there any merit to this folklore?

By Nathan Chandler

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3-D printing is helping animals — both wild and domestic — recover from injuries that might once have meant euthanasia.

By Patty Rasmussen

The magic of a blacker-than-black chicken like the Ayam Cemani is in its genetics.

By Jesslyn Shields

Geckos have abilities that definitely take lizardhood up a notch.

By Jesslyn Shields

Chameleons change color whenever they feel agitated, exhilarated, threatened or excited. OK, but how?

By Michelle Konstantinovsky

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There's a four-legged security officer patrolling your airport and this canine is on a mission to find illegal fruits and veggies.

Rabbits can be fluffy bundles of laziness or superbly rambunctious, but do they really go crazy in March?

By Bambi Turner

Don't let this fear keep you from using the porcelain throne! Snakes in toilets are extremely rare occurrences.

By Bambi Turner

Many marine and aquatic mammals can survive without breathing by slowing their heart rates and redirecting blood from their extremities to their brains, hearts and muscles.

By Jesslyn Shields

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Called gynandromorphs, half male and half female animals are rare, but they do exist.

By Tara Yarlagadda

The iconic horses step tall to promote wind power, which creates 100 percent of the electricity used to make Budweiser beer.

By John Donovan