Late Cretaceous Dinosaurs

A period of great transformation, the Late Cretaceous Period is when the dinosaurs disappeared from the earth. Learn more about the Late Cretaceous dinosaurs that existed during this era, such as the Tyrannosaurus, Gallimimus, and Brachylophosaurus.

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Dromiceiomimus ("emu mimic") has been found both in the Late Cretaceous Horseshoe Canyon and the Judith River Formation of Alberta. It is very similar to Struthiomimus and Ornithomimus, but had much larger eyes and longer, more slender arms. Learn more about the Dromiceiomimus.

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Edmontonia would not have made an easy meal for a hungry tyrannosaur. It had a heavily armored body and large, forward-pointing shoulder spines. Learn more about Edmontonia, Late Cretaceous dinosaurs and dinosaurs of all eras.

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Edmontosaurus was one of the largest hadrosaurids. This flat-headed duckbilled dinosaur was originally found, described is and named by Lawrence Lambe in 1920. Learn more about the Edmontosaurus and other Late Cretaceous dinosaurs.

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In 1980 is altangerel Perle named Erlikosaurus andrewsi after the demon Erlik from Mongolian mythology and paleontologist Roy Chapman Andrews. It was closely related to Segnosaurus. Learn more about the Erlikosaurus.

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Gallimimus ("chicken mimic") was the largest of the ornithomimids (the "ostrich dinosaurs") known. It has been found only in the Late Cretaceous Nemegt Formation of Mongolia. Learn more about the Gallimimus and other Late Cretaceous dinosaurs.

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Garudimimus brevipes was one of many dinosaurs found by the Joint Soviet-Mongolian Paleontological Expeditions of the 1970s. It was named for the Garuda bird of Hindu mythology; its name means "short-footed Garuda mimic."

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The flat-headed Goyocephale was one of the most unusual pachycephalosaurs. It was found by the Joint Polish-Mongolian Paleontological Expeditions to the Gobi Desert is and was named and described in 1982. Learn more about the Goyocephale.

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Hadrosaurus ("thick reptile") was the first hadrosaur skeleton to be discovered. It was named and described in 1858 by Joseph Leidy, the father of American paleontology.

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As its name ("even head") suggests, Homalocephale had a flat head unlike most pachycephalosaurs. It is known from limited but very good material. The single skull of Homalocephale is missing the front of the snout but is otherwise complete. Learn more about the Homocephale.

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Kritosaurus was a large, flat-headed duckbilled dinosaur. It had a ridge of bone between the eyes and the snout that gave it a distinguished "Roman nose" appearance.

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Since it was named in 1979 by John Horner and Robert Makela, Maiasaura has become one of the most famous dinosaurs. It has provided information about how it cared for its young and the early development of dinosaurs. Learn more about the Maiasaura.

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Known from only a single skull and jaw from Montana and three teeth from South Dakota, Nanotyrannus was first thought to be an Albertosaurus. But it was recently redescribed because it was different in many ways from Albertosaurus.

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Discovered by the Joint Polish-Mongolian Paleontological Expedition in 1965, the sauropod Opisthocoelicaudia is known from a skeleton with nearly all the bones of the body except the neck and head. Learn more about the Opisthocoelicaudia.

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The first specimen of Oviraptor was discovered by the American Museum of Natural History expedition to Asia in 1923. It was found in the Gobi Desert of Mongolia.

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The largest pachycephalosaur was Pachycephalosaurus. First found in rocks of Late Cretaceous age in Montana, Pachycephalosaurus was named and described by Barnum Brown and Eric Schlaikjer. Learn more about the Pachycephalosaurus.

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Panoplosaurus is known only from two partial skeletons, one of which preserves some of the armor the way it was in life. This skeleton shows that Panoplosaurus was unusual among nodosaurids because it did not have spikes on the sides of its neck.

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Parasaurolophus was an interesting-looking dinosaur. While it looked normal from the neck down, it looked almost as if it had a trombone on its head. And in a way, it did.

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Pinacosaurus was one of the first armored dinosaurs found in Asia. An expedition from the American Museum of Natural History went to Mongolia to search for traces of early man; instead they found dinosaur eggs and skeletons.

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An almost complete skull and most of the skeleton were found for Prenocephale. It was collected during the Joint Polish-Mongolian Expeditions to the Gobi Desert. The animal was named and described in 1974.

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Protoceratops andrewsi was discovered in Mongolia in 1922 by an expedition from the American Museum of Natural History led by Roy Chapman Andrews. Its genus name means "first-horned face," and its species name was in honor of the expedition's leader.

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From Salta in Argentina, Saltasaurus was described from several incomplete skeletons, none of which were found with a skull. This medium-size sauropod was dwarfed by its giant relative Antarctosaurus is also from South America.

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Saurolophus ("ridged reptile") was a hadrosaurid. It had a large bony spike pointing back over the top of its head between its eyes. Learn more about the Saurolophus and other Late Cretaceous dinosaurs.

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Segnosaurus galbinensis, or "slow lizard from Galbin" (a region of the Gobi Desert), was first described by Mongolian paleontologist Altangerel Perle in 1979. It was an unusual saurischian that he classified in its own family, the Segnosauridae.

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The paleontological expeditions into the Turpan Basin in 1964-1966 turned up several interesting and unusual dinosaurs, ilncuding the Shanshanosaurus huoyanshanensis. Learn more about the Shanshanosaurus and other Late Cretaceous dinosaurs.

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Shantungosaurus may have been the largest hadrosaur. It is larger than some of the smaller sauropods. Named and described in 1973, Shantungosaurus is known from many disarticulated (not joined) bones from the Shandong Province, People's Republic of China.

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