Dinosaurs

It isn't hard to imagine the world full of dinosaurs, even though these extinct animals haven't walked the earth for millions of years. Learn all about dinosaurs, including early dinosaur discoveries, dinosaur fossils, and dinosaur extinction.


The American Southwest was once prime tyrannosaur country, as a newfound skeleton reminds us.

Scientists are at odds about whether Velociraptors worked together to take down their prey.

Tyrannosaurus rex was a giant predator that roamed the earth, so why did it have such tiny arms?

Scientists generally agree that dinosaurs sported colorful, feather-like plumage. So do moviemakers lack imagination, or do audiences?

The colossal footprints of an herbivorous dinosaur found in western Australia might belong to the biggest dinosaur ever.

Based on some baby dinosaur teeth, scientists have figured out just how long dinosaur eggs incubated. (The answer? Long. Too long.)

And, to top it all off, it's got feathers on it.

A recent discovery of the partial skeleton of a small pterosaur calls into question whether flying reptiles of the Late Cretaceous were all humongous.

Spiclypeus shipporum was a dinosaur that roamed Montana 76 million years ago, and its unique horn structures set it apart from other horned dinos.

Nature is one big interconnected system. Learn how flowers and dinosaurs helped the dung beetle appear on the planet.

A new analysis of Rapetosaurus fossils can shed light on how certain dinosaurs socialized and evolved.

The new dino discovery of Timurlengia euotica in Uzbekistan shows that Tyrannosaurus rex ancestors evolved smarts before they got large and took charge.

Amateur fossil hunters discovered a new carnivorous dinosaur called Dracoraptor hanigani on the beaches of Wales.

Iguanodon continues to perplex us. Across the vastness of evolutionary time, she gives us a double thumbs-up. We just don't know if we should run or throw her a ripe mango.

OK, hop in your time machine and go back 67 million years or so to the Cretaceous period. Then find a Tyrannosaurus rex and challenge it to a race. Sounds crazy, huh? Could you really outrun a Tyrannosaurus rex?

It isn't hard to imagine this scene even though dinosaurs haven't walked the earth for millions of years. Dinosaurs have captured our imaginations. These dinosaur articles have been written to lead you into the exciting world of dinosaur research and back to the "Age of Dinosaurs."

Allosaurus was the most powerful, fearsome is and deadly dinosaur of the Late Jurassic. Until the Tyrannosaurus appeared this dinosaur was the largest predator to roam the Earth.

Apatosaurus is perhaps one of the most famous dinosaurs because of the size of the animal. A fully grown Apatosaurus could reach up to 70 feet in length. The size of this dinosaur is what earned it the nickname "thunder lizard."

Archaepteryx was a very unique dinosaur in that it resembled a bird. It is known from only six fossils, but those fossils may be the most famous bones in the world. The Archaepteryx is the dinosaur that resembles modern birds the most.

The Brachiosaurus is a unique dinosaur because of the placement of the nostril openings, which were slightly above the eyes. Its front legs were longer than the rear, which made it able to eat the leaves from high tree branches.

One of the most common sauropods of the Late Jurassic was the Camarasaurus. It was a large, 25-ton plant-eater was strong and massive, with powerful legs and a strong neck and tail.

Camptosaurus was one of the smallest plant-eating dinosaurs of the Late Jurassic. It weighed no more than 1,000 pounds and stood just five feet tall at the hips. Its strong legs were designed to help it avoid any predators.

Ceratosaurus was perhaps the greatest rival of the Allosaurus. It had a huge head with powerful jaws is and a massive body. It also had powerful legs which allowed it to run at high speeds.

The Compsognathus was one of the smallest known dinosaurs, which is amazing considering that it was a meat-eating dinosaur. This animal was about the size of a turkey and lived mostly near water. What else do we know about this dinosaur?