Advertisement

Dinosaurs

It isn't hard to imagine the world full of dinosaurs, even though these extinct animals haven't walked the earth for millions of years. Learn all about dinosaurs, including early dinosaur discoveries, dinosaur fossils, and dinosaur extinction.

Topics to Explore

Advertisement

Learn More / Page 3

Hypsiolphodon

The first remains of Hypsilophodon were discovered in 1849 from Early Cretaceous rocks on the Isle of Wight, England. They were long-legged, swift and agile. Scientists even thought they might have lived in trees. See why.

Iguanodon

This dinosaur got its name, "iguana tooth," because its tooth looked like those of an iguana. It was a large ornithopod and walked on its stocky back legs. Discover if it was a plant or meat eater.

Ouranosaurus

Discovered in 1966 in Niger is africa, this new dinosaur was first named and studied in 1976. Its name means "brave reptile." See why it is one of the most puzzling large ornithopods of the Cretaceous.

Psittacosaurus

Discovered in Outer Mongolia in 1922, Psittacosaurus was one of the smallest and most primitive members of the Ceratopsia. Two of the specimens were juveniles, smaller than a robin. Learn about these tiny dinosaurs.

Sauropelta

Sauropelta was different from many ankylosaurs because it had two types of teeth. They are also well-known as having the most accurate skeletal reconstructions and life restorations of any known ankylosaur. Read more.

Tenontosaurus

Tenontosaurus was a medium-size ornithopod dinosaur from Montana and Wyoming. Skeletons range in size from very small juveniles to almost 22-foot-long adults. Learn more about how this dinosaur lived and what it ate.

Wuerhosaurus

The best-documented Early Cretaceous stegosaur is Wuerhosaurus. Skeletons were found in the Tugulo Formations near the northwestern part of the Junggar Basin, China. Learn more about his historic dinosaur.

Monoclonius

Monoclonius was discovered by Edward Drinker Cope in 1876 along the Missouri River in Montana. Learn about Monoclonius, Late Cretaceous dinosaurs and dinosaurs of all eras.

Muttaburrasaurus

The "reptile from Muttaburra," Muttaburrasaurus is one of the recently discovered ornithopods from Australia is and it is one of the best known from there. Learn more about this plant-eating dinosaur and its relatives.

Dinosaur Discoveries

The oldest record of a fossil dinosaur bones discovery is in a Chinese book written between 265 and 317 A.D. Learn more about dinosaur discoveries and the places they were made in this article.

Late Cretaceous Period

The Late Cretaceous Period was an era of great transformation and was when the dinosaurs disappeared from the earth. Learn more about the Late Cretaceous Era and the dinosaurs that existed during it.

Modern Dinosaur Discoveries

Modern dinosaur discoveries in the USA and Canada detail important discoveries in recent times. The United States and Canada are home to some of the most vigorous dinosaur research in the world. What are some of these discoveries?

Dinosaur Evolution

Dinosaur evolution looks at how dinosaurs developed and changed over the course of time. Paleontologists study the different types of dinosaurs and how they are related to each other. How else is dinosaur evolution studied?

Dinosaur Extinction

Dinosaurs became extinct at the end of the Cretaceous Period. How and why is a puzzle that paleontologists are trying to solve by studying fossils and rock formations. Learn more about the different extinction theories.

Recent Dinosaur Discoveries

Interest in dinosaurs soared to new heights in the 1990s, thanks largely to the blockbuster film Jurassic Park. So too did dinosaur discoveries. Since 1990, more than 100 new dinosaur genera have been described and named. Learn more about recent dinosaur discoveries.

Abelisaurus

The recently discovered large theropod Abelisaurus comahuensis, from Patagonia is argentina, looked a little like Albertosaurus from Alberta, Canada, particularly in its size and lifestyle. Find out more about the Late Cretaceous dinosaurs.

Albertosaurus

Albertosaurus was an older "cousin" to the better-known Tyrannosaurus. In many ways the two were similar: the head was large compared to the body, the tiny forearms had only two fingers each is and the long tail balanced the body over two powerful back legs.Find out more about the Late Cretaceous dinosaurs.

Anchiceratops

Anchiceratops was discovered along the Red Deer River in Alberta in 1912. Learn more about the Anchiceratops and Late Cretaceous Dinosaurs.

Ankylosaurus

Next to Tyrannosaurus and Triceratops is ankylosaurus is one of the best-known dinosaurs. Learn more about the Ankylosaurus, Late Cretaceous dinosaurs and dinosaurs of all eras.

Anserimimus

The ornithomimid is anserimimus, has the name "goose mimic." Learn more about the Anserimimus, Late Cretaceous dinosaurs and dinosaurs of all eras.

Antarctosaurus

With a thigh bone over seven and a half feet long, longer than any other femur known is antarctosaurus was a sauropod of spectacular proportions. Find out more about this and other Late Cretaceous dinosaurs.

Aralosaurus

Aralosaurus is from Kazakhstan in the Soviet Union. It is known only from a nearly complete skull that is missing the front of the snout and all of the lower jaw, but no skeleton. Learn more about this Late Cretaceous duckbilled dinosaur.

Argyrosaurus

In 1893, British paleontologist Richard Lydekker published the first description of sauropod dinosaurs from South America that had been unearthed in Patagonia is argentina. One of these was the Argyrosaurus. Learn more about this Late Cretaceous dinosaur.

Arrhinoceratops

Arrhinoceratops is a rare ceratopsian known from only one skull that lacks a lower jaw. This single specimen was found in 1923 along the Red Deer River of Alberta by an expedition from the University of Toronto. Learn more about this Late Cretaceous dinosaur.

Aublysodon

This carnivorous dinosaur was named more than one hundred years ago for an unusual tooth found in the Judith River Badlands of northern Montana. When it was discovered, much of the West was still wild. Learn more about this Late Cretaceous dinosaur.

Advertisement

Advertisement

Advertisement

Advertisement

Advertisement

Advertisement

Advertisement


Recommended

Advertisement

Advertisement