Wild Animals

Whether they crawl, fly, swim, slither, walk, run or pounce, wild animals rely on their instincts. Read about all kinds of wild animals, mammals, birds, fish, insects, reptiles and amphibians.

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Learn More / Page 27

Why do people collect shark teeth?

Sharks can have up to 15 rows of teeth growing behind their front row of chompers, so it's no surprise how many shark teeth litter beaches. But why do people collect them?

Squid Pictures

Squid are actually mollusks is although they look much different from their relatives the gastropods (snails) is and bivalves (clams). Check out this image gallery to learn more interesting squid facts.

How Wasps Work

Despite the fact you'll never find anything called "wasp honey," wasps perform a vital service by helping to pollinate the world's plant life -- and eliminate various six- and eight-legged pests.

Can a Bag of Water Keep Flies Away?

Have you ever seen a water bag hanging in a restaurant? It's not a design trend — some people say the bags repel flies. Does this method hold water?

Are figs really full of baby wasps?

If you're snacking on fig bars, make sure to check the nutritional content for wasps. Wasps risk their lives to provide enough figs to satisfy every fruit- and cake-related craving.

How do sharks see, smell and hear?

You don't reign supreme over the marine food chain without acute senses that can smell blood or hear injured prey from great distances. And sometimes a "sixth sense" doesn't hurt either.

How Houseflies Work

Swat it, smash it, spray it. It's tough to get rid of the world's most annoying roommate: the housefly. But at least the housefly won't steal your food -- whoops, never mind.

How Caterpillars Work

A caterpillar spends its life eating -- foliage, some animals like ants and snails, and even its own skin it previously shed. What do caterpillars do with all of this stored up food? And why do they use their waste as projectiles?

What's the difference between moths and butterflies?

The difference between butterflies and moths is a lot like the difference between frogs and toads. There are some rules of thumb you can follow to tell them apart, but there are also exceptions to those rules. So how do you tell the difference?

How Tiger Sharks Work

Have you ever been so hungry that you could eat anything? How about a hubcap? Or maybe a suit of armor? If you said "yes," you might have something in common with the second deadliest shark.

Shark Pictures

Sharks are an intelligent and sometimes dangerous species of saltwater fish. Learn more about these often feared, often misunderstood creatures of the deep in this gallery.

How do a zebra's stripes act as camouflage?

I've heard that the black and white stripes on a zebra provide camouflage. How can this be if they're not in a black-and-white environment?

What are chiggers and how do they bite?

If you have ever been out in the woods or an open field in spring, summer or fall, you may have gotten chiggers around your waistband or on your ankles. They leave red, itchy bumps on your skin. Learn more about these arachnids.

Where do butterflies get their striking colors?

The brilliantly colored orange wings of a monarch butterfly are as recognizable as the plumes of a peacock. Why are butterfly colors some of the best and brightest in nature?

How Polar Bears Work

The polar bear's shocking whiteness, ferocity and sheer size make it an icon of purity and power. How do these animals survive in a frigid climate?

How Coral Reefs Work

How do coral polyps mere millimeters in length form the world's largest living structures? Will these giants of the sea last much longer if the present rate of destruction continues?

How Butterflies Work

If you've seen a butterfly in your lifetime, you probably noticed their colorful wings, or saw one basking in the sunlight. But I bet you didn't realize that it would soon die. Why are their life spans so short, and are they nearly extinct?

How Octopuses Work

To elude predators, the octopus will change color in an instant and even alter its shape to look like other sea animals. Does its magic put the chameleon to shame?

What's the difference between a wallaby and a kangaroo?

If you want to determine whether you've got your hands on a wallaby or a kangaroo, you're going to have to pry open the animal's mouth and examine its molars.

How Walruses Work

Each year, thousands of male Pacific walruses pack the beaches of Round Island off the coast of Alaska. Is there a reason for this months-long male bonding?

What's the difference between bees and wasps?

Wasps and bees are different, yes. But how can we distinguish? Here's a hint: The bee's the one near the flowers. The wasp's the one buzzing around your turkey sandwich.

How Frogs Work

Frogs have been around for about 200 million years. In that time, they've adapted to their changing surroundings to ensure their survival. How have they changed, and what's the difference between frogs and toads, anyway?

Why is the birth rate so low for giant pandas?

Since 1990, there have been only five panda cubs born in the United States. This may seem a little low. Getting pandas to mate in captivity is extremely difficult. Why is the birth rate for giant pandas so low? Find out the answer in this article.

How Fainting Goats Work

Fainting goats don't really faint -- their muscles tense up and they fall over when they get scared. But why would anyone want a fainting goat?

Why are cicadas so noisy?

Cicada singing is often heard during the hot summer months. The distinctive high-pitched noise often fills the air. Have you ever wondered why the cicadas produce this noise. Find out the answer to this question in this HowStuffWorks article.


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