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Aquatic Mammals

Aquatic mammals such as whales and dolphins live and feed in the ocean. The Blue Whale is the biggest mammal on Earth.


Narwhals Caught on Video Using Their Tusks to Hunt

It's the first evidence researchers have of the whales using their "unicorn horns" to capture prey. See more »

Solar Flares Could Scramble Signals, Cause Mysterious Whale Beachings

Each year, hundreds of healthy whales end up stranded on beaches, and scientists are investigating what could be behind the phenomenon. See more »

Orca Menopause May Be Related to Mother-Daughter Competition

Only three mammal species on Earth lose the ability to reproduce during middle age. Killer whales, like us, are one of that select group. But why? See more »

Narwhal Echolocation Abilities Exceed Those of Any Other Animal, Study Finds

It turns out that one of the world's most enchanting animals has even stronger superpowers than we previously knew. Surprise! See more »

Humpback Whales Save the Day for Seals, Other Species

Is it altruism? Revenge? Marine scientists aren't quite sure why humpbacks will sometimes save other animals from killer whales on the hunt. See more »

Orcas Altered Their Own Evolution

Orcas have culture, just like humans do. And that culture can influence their evolution. See more »

SeaWorld Ends Orca Program

The current orcas residing at SeaWorld will be the last generation housed there. See more »

What makes beached whales explode?

If a massive whale washed up on your beachfront, you'd think that the bulk of the problem would be ... well, its bulk. But if you were covered in decomposing whale guts, you'd think differently. See more »

Known as the largest animals in the world, Blue Whales filter some 6 to 7 tons of krill at a time with their baleen plates, "gulping" water and krill, then closing the mouth and forcing the water back out through the baleen. See more »

Covered with silver-white fur, the harp seal can weigh up to 320 and resides in the frigid temperatures and ice floes of the Artic. See more »