Perching Birds

Perching birds, or songbirds, are the most common birds on Earth. From cardinals to wrens, explore the different types of perching birds.


Sure, your voice is great. But can you move? That's what female Java sparrows want to know before they get busy, a new study finds.

From tail to beak the American crow appears totally black. In the right light, however, a green or bluish tinge suddenly makes a showing.

The bright yellow plumage of male birds give the American goldfinch its name. A black forehead and black wings with white accents stand out against the yellow body.

This small, but colorful falcon is a bird of prey or raptor. Read on to learn more about this bird.

Catching sight of this gray bird with a brick-red belly usually signifies the start of spring. Read on to learn more about this bird.

As its name suggests the barn swallow frequently takes up residence in barns and is, therefore, seen in the skies above farms and agricultural lands. Read on to learn more about this bird.

The black-capped chickadee feeds on insect eggs and larvae by hanging upside down while clinging to the undersides of tree branches. Read on to learn more about this bird.

The blue jay can be seen roaming the skies in deciduous forests, but is also a common sight in city parks and back yards. Read on to learn more about this bird.

True to its name the head of the brown-headed cowbird is brown. The cow part of its name comes from the fact that this bird tends to associate with cows or horses while foraging for food.

Chipping sparrows spend winters and summers in grassy woodlands, along rivers and lakes, and even in city parks. Read on to learn more about this bird.

This medium-sized sparrow can vary in color, but is generally slate gray with a white belly and, of course, dark eyes. Read on to learn more about this bird.

True to its name the male eastern bluebird is colored a brilliant blue along its back, wings and tail. Read on to learn more about this bird.

Contrary to its name, the eastern kingbird can be seen in the skies throughout North America as well as in the Amazon. Read on to learn more about this bird.

These birds are relatively unafraid of people and will sometimes locate nests on buildings and bridges if other natural nesting sites, such as a cliff, are not available. Read on to learn more about this bird.

Smaller than a robin, this black bird turns a striking iridescent purple and green in the spring. Read on to learn more about this bird.

The great horned is a large owl and varies in color according to its place of residence. Read on to learn more about this bird.

True to its name, house sparrows tend to stay close to the homes and buildings of people. They can be found in cities, towns and agricultural areas. Read on to learn more about this bird.

House wrens can be seen in wooded areas, but as their name suggests they tend to reside near the homes of people, particularly in small towns and suburban back yards. Read on to learn more about this bird.

Indigo buntings find comfort in open areas with plenty of bushes and shrubs to raise their young. Read on to learn more about this bird.

Widespread across North America, this bird gets its name from the sorrowful song it sings. Read on to learn more about this bird.

Northern cardinals are probably one of the most easily identifiable birds of its species because of its bright red color. Read on to learn more about this bird.

The northern mockingbird is the same size as the Robin and is gray on top and white on its chest. Read on to learn more about the northern mockingbird.

The pine siskin is brown and heavily streaked with black. Read on to learn more about this bird.

The red-winged blackbird is found across the United States in wetlands and grassy areas, including marshes and meadows. Read on to learn more about this bird.

Where there are people, the rock dove thrives. This bird can be found in city centers, city parks, tourist areas, and suburban gardens and farmlands.