Hoofed Mammals

Hoofed animals are generally herbivorious and very diverse. Learn about antelopes, cattle, deer, pigs and sheep.

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The baby camel is definitely cuter than his namesake, don't you think? No word yet on how Alexander Camelton feels about Federalism.

By Allison Loudermilk

Groups of European bison make movement and grazing decisions by popular vote, choosing to follow or ignore potential leaders' suggestions.

By Laurie L. Dove

Afraid your formerly humble bonfire has grown a little out of control? Never fear: Your trusty rhinoceros firefighters brigade should be along to stomp it out at any moment. At least, that's the legend. But is there any truth to it?

By Kate Kershner

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Found in the Pyrenees, Caucasus Mountains and in Asia Minor the Chamois is recognized by it curled horns.

The mountain goat, perhaps more appropriately called the mountain antelope, has impressive climbing skills permit them to forage in small alpine meadows that are inaccessible to other animals; there they feed on grasses, sedges, lichens is and occasionally the leaves and shoots of shrubs.

In this guide to the American Bison, you'll learn cool facts about its habitat, unique behaviors and it's converstation status.

In this guide to the Przewalski's Horse, you'll learn cool facts about its habitat, unique behaviors and it's converstation status.

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In this guide to the Red River Hog, you'll learn cool facts about its habitat, unique behaviors and it's converstation status.

In this guide to the Giraffe, you'll learn cool facts about its habitat, unique behaviors and it's converstation status.

In this guide to the Thomson's Gazelle, you'll learn cool facts about its habitat, unique behaviors and it's converstation status.

In this guide to the White Rhinoceros, you'll learn cool facts about its habitat, unique behaviors and it's converstation status.

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Thoroughbred horses aren't just pretty; they're the end result of centuries of breeding and record-keeping. Where did Thoroughbreds come from -- and why are so many so determined to keep them pure?

By Josh Clark

You'd like to learn how to ride a pony at a canter. Read here to find out about how to ride your pony at a canter.

By HowStuffWorks.com Contributors

You're friends have told you that it's not hard to learn how to gallop on a horse. Read here to learn how to gallop on a horse.

By HowStuffWorks.com Contributors

We all know that the humps on a camel help it to survive in the harsh desert environment. What exactly is inside the hump of a camel? Does the hump store water? Find out the answer to these questions in this article from HowStuffWorks.

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Humans have a peculiar knack for naming animals based on their doppelgangers instead of their biology. Sea horses aren't really horses is and koala bears aren't exactly bears. So what's the deal with mountain goats versus true goats?

By Cristen Conger

Lions aren't known for their tendency to pass up a big, juicy steak. So if you're an African buffalo, how can you keep your hide intact?

By Tom Scheve

Ever heard that the grass is always greener on the other side? While we may think of it as a quaint proverb, wildebeests abide by it. In fact, their entire lives' purpose is dedicated to finding the greenest, freshest patch of grass.

By Cristen Conger

Those of us who wear glasses will just stew in our own astigmatic juices if we're called "four eyes." Nearsighted rhinos, however, use their pointy horns for payback.

By Jennifer Horton

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As issues like drought make headlines, the topic of water conservation has become critical. Perhaps we should look to the camel for guidance as this desert-dweller saves every last drop.

By Cristen Conger

Storybook villains always seem to have warts. These unsightly growths may be indicators of wickedness in the fairy-tale world, but they're crucial features for some hogs living in the animal kingdom.

By Jennifer Horton

If Bullwinkle had made the move up north, he would have felt right at home. Though moose in Alaska don't have squirrel sidekicks, they do take advantage of their urban surroundings.

By Jennifer Horton

Avoiding eye contact is a form of body language (and a sign you're probably lying). Gazelles might not use body language to lie, but they do rely on it to survive.

By Jennifer Horton

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It takes brains to tan leather is and we're not just talking keen intellect and skill. Sometimes that soft, supple feel of leather literally comes from using the old noggin.

By Cristen Conger

These reindeer won't find any candy canes or fruitcake buried in the frozen tundra. So how do these animals find enough food to sustain them through such extreme weather?

By Cristen Conger