Mammals

Scientifically-speaking there are 11 mammal groups, and most Mammals are warm-blooded, have body hair, give live birth and nurse their young with milk from mammary glands. Check out these articles about all kinds of mammals.

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Arguably the most charming rodent in the world, the capybara is also the largest.

By Jesslyn Shields

It is the largest animal ever to exist on the planet.

By Tara Yarlagadda

Despite being known as the "lesser panda," the red panda is so totally cute, we simply can't use that moniker. No way. Not now. Not ever.

By John Perritano

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The ocelot may look like a slightly wilder version of a domesticated tabby cat, but they are three times the size of house cats, much fiercer and, though abundant in some areas, still endangered.

By Michelle Konstantinovsky

These adorable little rodents are popular as pets, but they require some special care.

By Jesslyn Shields

It may seem like just the cutest thing in the world to you, but owning a pet monkey is a really bad idea. Here's why.

By Tara Yarlagadda

These little critters are super cute, so why do they have a reputation for being one of the worst of the mammal world?

By Mark Mancini

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Llamas and alpacas are very similar animals, but the differences in personality are striking.

By Jesslyn Shields

Because most of what we know about honey badgers comes from a three-minute comedy video, there are a lot of misconceptions about these wily weasels.

By Jesslyn Shields

Sure, hedgehogs are cute as heck, but do you think one really wants to live in your house?

By Jesslyn Shields

There doesn't seem to be much of a gray area. Most people are a hard yes or yard no.

By Meg Sparwath

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Sure, opossums eat out of your trashcan, but they're also strange little superheroes.

By Jesslyn Shields

Your favorite cashmere sweater is super-soft and luxurious. It probably cost you an arm and leg, too. Here's why.

By Jamie Allen

A group of researchers in Shennongjia National Nature Reserve discovered that these female monkeys are essentially happy to feed each other's offspring.

By Jamie Allen

Perhaps it's a mating signal. Or meant to confuse owls and other predators. Or maybe it's just for looks.

By Jamie Allen

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Elephants make a specific sound to warn each other of nearby humans.

By Loraine Fick

A dolphin doesn't breathe automatically, so during sleep, one side of its brain stays awake to ensure the mammal rises to the surface and breathes.

By Loraine Fick

Penguins stand for months on the coldest ice in the world without their feet freezing, thanks to special blood circulation.

By Loraine Fick

It looks excruciating, and nobody knows exactly why it happens.

By Jesslyn Shields

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Before you declare which team you're on, we've got the breakdown on this auditory battle royal.

By Mark Mancini

When we think of big cats in the wild, we most likely think of lions and tigers. But there are so many more amazing wild cats you've probably never even heard of. Here are five.

By Oisin Curran

Do humpback whales get tired of singing the same old song, or do they simply start over when it gets too complicated?

By Jesslyn Shields

A first-of-its-kind study reaffirms why wolves are vital to the health of our ecosystem.

By Michelle Konstantinovsky

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The annual bison roundup in South Dakota's Custer State Park is a spectacle full of cowboys, horses and of course wild buffalo, all set against the backdrop of the rolling Black Hills. It's also about as Americana as you can get.

By John Donovan

Scientists have known for a long time that elephants have no sweat glands and keep cool through slinging mud on their skin. But they didn't know what made the skin so wrinkled — until now.

By Nathan Chandler